Monday, November 15, 2010

DAY OF THE IMPRISONED WRITER

Today is the annual observation of the Day of the Imprisoned Writer, created by International PEN, to recognize and support writers who resist suppression of the basic human right to freedom of expression. It was started in 1981 by International PEN's Writers in Prison Committee.

Also this week PEN Center USA, located in Los Angeles, holds its annual Lit Awards, at which Ethiopian journalist Sisay Agena will be awarded this year's Freedom to Write Award. He will not be able to attend because he is in prison in Ethiopia. You can find out more about Agena's situation at the PEN Center USA website, at the link above.

Recently I have read How to Read the Air, by Dinaw Mengestu, son of Ethiopian immigrants to America, as well as Cutting For Stone, by Abraham Verghese, a novel set in Ethiopia. In October, on my plane trip to Florida, I sat next to an Ethiopian woman who was visiting the United States for the first time and wanted more than anything to move here with her two daughters. I learned that life for women in Ethiopia is not good at all. The thought of standing up to or defying her husband in any way brought a look of intense fear to her face.

Here I am, safe in my home, reading and writing whatever I please. I am married to a man who respects me and whom I respect. I can meet other readers and discuss books anytime I want. Reading about the number of journalists and writers who are imprisoned around the world, even as close by as Mexico, makes me realize that we better not take our freedoms for granted.

2 comments:

  1. J - Thanks for your recent comment on my piece at The Millions. Your comment, "I am crying," was quite something. That's one way to get to a writer fast! I like your blog and the thoughts I read here. This piece, in particular, caught my eye, as I wrote about prison writing in a previous piece at The Millions. I thought you might be interested: http://www.themillions.com/2010/08/a-harbored-notion.html. Regardless, keep up the good work, supporting--and adding to--the written word. Best regards,
    Doug

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  2. Doug - So nice to hear back from you. Your piece about prisons was great. I just really like your writing voice. I have bookmarked your blog and will visit again.
    I have never been to Maine but I have a deep affinity for authors from Maine.
    Best wishes to you.

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